Unlock Drivers of Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 to Combat Against COVID-19

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is a novel virus, short for SARS-CoV-2...

Unlock Drivers of Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 to Combat Against COVID-19

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is a novel virus, short for SARS-CoV-2. The surface stability and resulting transmission of SARS-CoV-2, specifically in indoor environments, is a potential pandemic challenge that requires investigation. SARS-CoV-2 can be found on various surfaces in contaminated sites such as hospitals, restaurants and other public places. However, the behavior and molecular interactions between the virus and the surfaces are poorly understood.

Recently Joonaki and co-workers at the TÜV SÜD UK National Engineering Laboratory first give “an overview of existing knowledge concerning viral spread, molecular structure of SARS-CoV-2, and the virus surface stability is presented”. And they “highlight potential drivers of the SARS-CoV-2 surface adsorption and stability in various environmental conditions”, which was published on Cell Press.

Generally, some viruses can maintain their activities and transmission in the environment for a long time, which is possibly due to the adsorption process on surfaces. The researchers found that “some important factors influencing the virus adsorption phenomenon include surface-active moieties of the viral proteins, hydrophilic or hydrophobic characteristic of the solid surface, pH of the bulk fluid, relative humidity, and temperature of the environment.” Their theoretical analysis throughout this study has “demonstrated that the SARS-CoV- 2 can be adsorbed onto surfaces and remain stable within a range of pH values from acidic to basic environments at moderate temperature”. According to the Kelvin equation, it is expected that the SARS-CoV-2 would be less stable in higher temperature conditions. Accordingly, it can be hypothesized that “the rate of transmission and infection will be lower during the summer months than in winter months”. “The preservation of the virus shape and structure after condensation and/or evaporation processes in the air and/or water and the viral electrostatic surface properties of SARS-CoV-2 should also be explored.”

It is said in this article that“Attaining this valuable information on the SARS-CoV-2 structure and assembly is necessary for helping scientists globally with antiviral drug and vaccine design to combat against COVID-19, given that the development of antiviral drugs is a promising direction for mitigating this new worldwide health threat.”

More information: Edris Joonaki et al. (2020). Surface Chemistry Can Unlock Drivers of Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 in a Variety of Environmental Conditions. Cell Press. DOI: 10.1016/j.chempr.2020.08.001

Quote Request
Verification code