Fragment-based Drug Discovery

Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), also known as fragment-based lead discovery, is gaining momentum as a complementary...

Fragment-based Drug Discovery

Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a powerful method for identifying new drug candidates. BOC Sciences has extensive capabilities in fragment-based drug discovery, and our experienced synthetic, pharmaceutical and computational chemistry teams provide expertise in screening, structural biology, as well as computational and pharmaceutical chemistry. We can effectively support your pharmaceutical chemistry project and support the development of your hot molecules into clinical drug candidates.

Fragment-based drug discovery, also known as fragment-based lead discovery, is gaining momentum as a complementary approach to traditional screening. This is because significantly fewer compounds are required to be synthesized and screened by fragment-based approaches. A high success rate is also shown in generating chemicals with lead-like properties. The starting fragments have low molecular mass when compared with other traditional screening hits. Although the binding interactions of these fragments with a target protein are weak, they can be structurally understood through multiple techniques and exhibit high “ligand efficiency”.

Fragment-based Drug Discovery

Our Services

BOC Sciences' FBDD service is dedicated to providing customers with cost-effective, high-quality potential candidate generation solutions:

Fragment-based Drug Discovery

BOC Sciences’ fragment libraries set offers various compounds that can be individually selected based on customs’ criteria, allowing researchers to build fragment sets of size and composition best suited to their research methodologies. BOC Sciences offers world class service in chemical synthesis of a wide variety of organic compounds on the milligram to kilogram scale at competitive price.

References

  1. Spiliotopoulos, D. , & Caflisch, A. . (2016). Fragment-based in silico screening of bromodomain ligands. Drug Discovery Today: Technologies, S1740674916300051
  2. Daniel A Erlanson. (2011). Introduction to Fragment-Based Drug Discovery. Topics in Current Chemistry, 317:1-32
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